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Acceptable Use Policy



"A document that sets the rules by which an end user accesses the Internet through their Internet service provider" (Simpson, 123).


Simpson, Carol. Copyright for Schools: A Practical Guide. 4th ed. Worthington, OH: Linworth Publishing, Inc., 2005.



Copyright


"The exclusive right to reproduce, publish, and sell the matter and form of a literary, musical, or artistic work."


Simpson, Carol. Copyright for Schools: A Practical Guide. 4th ed. Worthington, OH: Linworth Publishing, Inc., 2005. 210.

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"Copyright Duration." Copyright Website. Web. 29 Aug 2010. <http://www.benedict.com/Info/Law/Duration.aspx>.


Fair Use


This law give "citizens special exceptions to the strict legal copyright requirements...for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research...In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • The purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature, or is for nonprofit educational purposes;

  • The nature of the copyrighted work;

  • The amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and

  • The effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."


Simpson, Carol. Copyright for Schools: A Practical Guide. 4th ed. Worthington, OH: Linworth Publishing, Inc., 2005. 39.

Intellectual property


"Property (as an idea, invention, or process) that derives from the work of the mind or intellect. For example: any song that you write is your intellectual property."


"Intellectual Property." Merriam-Webster. Merriam-Webster, Incorporated, 2010. Web. 27 Aug 2010. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/intellectual%20property.


Licensing

When people purchase software (computer games, music CDs, etc.), they don't actually own the software - just "the right to use the software in a manner described in a license agreement, usually included in the documentation of the software package."


Simpson, Carol. Copyright for Schools: A Practical Guide. 4th ed. Worthington, OH: Linworth Publishing, Inc., 2005. 136.

Nondisclosure agreement


"This is also known as a 'Confidentiality Agreement,' and it's used when someone with an unpatented idea shows it to another party, and wants that party to maintain as confidential any information he learns about the product as a result of the meeting."


"Nondisclosure Agreement." About.com: Inventors. New York Time Company, 2010. Web. 27 Aug 2010. http://inventors.about.com/od/nondisclosure/Non_Disclosure_Agreements.htm

Patent


"This gives scientists and inventors exclusive rights to their discoveries and inventions" (991).


"Intellectual Property." Gale Encyclopedia of Everyday Law. 2nd ed. 2 vol. New York: Thomson Gale, 2006. Print.



Piracy


"Illegal copying of computer software."


Simpson, Carol. Copyright for Schools: A Practical Guide. 4th ed. Worthington, OH: Linworth Publishing, Inc., 2005. 136.


Plagiarism


"The act of stealing and passing off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own: using (another's production) without crediting the source."


"Plagiarize." Merriam-Webster. Merriam-Webster, Incorporated, 2010. Web. 27 Aug 2010. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/plagiarize?show=0&t=1282938542.

Public Domain


"The realm embracing property rights that belong to the community at large, are unprotected by copyright or patent, and are subject to appropriation by anyone."


"Public Domain." Merriam-Webster. Merriam-Webster, Incorporated, 2010. Web. 29 Aug 2010.http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/public+domain?show=0&t=1283095700.


Royalty fees


"A share of the product or profit; a payment to an author or composer for each copy of a work sold or to an inventor for each item sold under a patent."


"Royalties." Merriam-Webster. Merriam-Webster, 2010. Web. 27 Aug 2010. <http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/royalties>.


Trademarks


"Akin to copyright, but dealing with identifiable items related to business, short phrases, symbols, logos, etc., trademarks are their own universe of intellectual property" (Simpson, 31).


"A trademark is a device used by businesses to distinguish their goods and services from competitors' goods and services. It may consist of a word, a symbol, a logo, or any combination thereof, so long as it clearly signifies the source of owership for a product or service" (Gale 991).


"Intellectual Property." Gale Encyclopedia of Everyday Law. 2nd ed. 2 vol. New York: Thomson Gale, 2006. Print.

Simpson, Carol. Copyright for Schools: A Practical Guide. 4th ed. Worthington, OH: Linworth Publishing, Inc., 2005.